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Dr. Richard Lieber Inducted into AIMBE College of Fellows

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Richard Lieber, PhD — Shirley Ryan AbilityLab senior vice president and chief scientific officer — was inducted into the American Institute for Medical and Biomedical Engineering’s (AIMBE) College of Fellows at the organization’s annual meeting March 25 in Washington, D.C.

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The College of Fellows is a distinction reserved for the top 2 percent of medical and biological engineers in the country, including the most accomplished and distinguished research directors, professors, innovators and entrepreneurs. Admittance follows a process of nomination, review and election by peers.

Dr. Lieber joins six other Shirley Ryan AbilityLab researchers in the College of Fellows: 2018 inductees Wendy Murray, PhD; and James Patton, PhD; plus Todd Kuiken, MD, PhD; Lee Miller, PhD; Sandro Mussa-Ivaldi, PhD; and Eric Perreault, PhD.

Engineering tools are powerful. The whole world is becoming more quantitative, so applying engineering tools to help our patients is critical.

Richard Lieber, PhD, Shirley Ryan AbilityLab senior vice president and chief scientific officer

AIMBE College of Fellows — Shirley Ryan AbilityLab

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Dr. Lieber is recognized by AIMBE for his “discovery and translation of musculoskeletal knowledge with emphasis on tissue biophysics to clinical practice of orthopedic surgery and rehabilitation.” Since his early days in California, Dr. Lieber has remained, he says, “hyper-focused” on muscle. He has published more than 300 papers in his career and is currently working on developing approaches to understanding muscle contractures that result from cerebral palsy, stroke and spinal cord injury.

“I’ve been doing it for so long and I’ve stayed in my lane: Muscle as it relates to making people better,” he said.

One distinguishing feature of AIMBE’s College of Fellows is the emphasis on having scientists advocate for and lobby on behalf of the research community. Dr. Lieber is excited about this aspect, as it’s something he’s been doing for years.

“I totally believe in the AIMBE mission,” he said. “Engineering tools are powerful. The whole world is becoming more quantitative, so applying engineering tools to help our patients is critical.”

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