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RehabMeasures Instrument

Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale

Last Updated

Purpose

This measure was developed initially for sedentary adults in the community who participated in an outpatient exercise program including biking, rowing, and walking. The revision of McAuley's self-efficacy barriers to exercise measure was based on a combined quantitative and qualitative study exploring factors that influenced adherence to a regular walking program for older adults.

Link to Instrument

Instrument Details

Acronym SEE

Area of Assessment

Self-efficacy

Assessment Type

Patient Reported Outcomes

Administration Mode

Paper & Pencil

Cost

Free

Diagnosis/Conditions

  • Pulmonary Disorders
  • Stroke Recovery

Key Descriptions

  • The Self Efficacy for Exercise scale consists of nine situations (weather, boredom, pain, exercising alone, not pleasurable, too busy, feel tired, stress, depressed) that might effect participation in exercise.
  • For each situation, the subject uses the scale from 0 (Not Confident) to 10 (Very Confident) to describe his current confidence that he could exercise 3 times a week for 20 minutes each time.

Number of Items

9

Equipment Required

  • Paper & Pencil

Time to Administer

5 minutes

5 minutes or less

Required Training

No Training

Age Ranges

Adult

18 - 64

years

Elderly Adult

65 +

years

Instrument Reviewers

Deb Kegelmeyer PT, DPT, MS, GCS, & the PD EDGE Task Force of the Neurology Section of the APTA

ICF Domain

Participation

Professional Association Recommendation

Recommendations for use of the instrument from the Neurology Section of the American Physical Therapy Association’s Multiple Sclerosis Taskforce (MSEDGE), Parkinson’s Taskforce (PD EDGE), Spinal Cord Injury Taskforce (PD EDGE), Stroke Taskforce (StrokEDGE), Traumatic Brain Injury Taskforce (TBI EDGE), and Vestibular Taskforce (Vestibular EDGE) are listed below. These recommendations were developed by a panel of research and clinical experts using a modified Delphi process.

 

For detailed information about how recommendations were made, please visit:  http://www.neuropt.org/go/healthcare-professionals/neurology-section-outcome-measures-recommendations

 

Abbreviations:

 

HR

Highly Recommend

R

Recommend

LS / UR

Reasonable to use, but limited study in target group  / Unable to Recommend

NR

Not Recommended

 

Recommendations Based on Parkinson Disease Hoehn and Yahr stage: 

 

I

II

III

IV

V

PD EDGE

LS/UR

LS/UR

LS/UR

LS/UR

LS/UR

 

Recommendations for entry-level physical therapy education and use in research:

 

Students should learn to administer this tool? (Y/N)

Students should be exposed to tool? (Y/N)

Appropriate for use in intervention research studies? (Y/N)

Is additional research warranted for this tool (Y/N)

PD EDGE

No

No

Yes

Not reported

Considerations

Do you see an error or have a suggestion for this instrument summary? Please e-mail us!

Non-Specific Patient Population

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Normative Data

(Resnick B and Jenkins L, 2000; 187 adults mean age 85 (6.2), including 98% white and 82% female, 80% married living in a continuing care retirement community) 

  • mean score = 5.5 (3), range = 0 - 10

Internal Consistency

(Resnick and Jenkins, 2000) 

  • Internal consistency, [alpha] = 0.92

Criterion Validity (Predictive/Concurrent)

(Resnick and Jenkins 2000) 

SF-12 subscale scores, when controlled for age and gender, significantly predicted SEE scores (F = 38.9; p < 0.05; F = 24.3; p < 0.05). The SF-12 subscale scores for mental health accounted for 17% of the variance in SEE scores, and the SF-12 subscale scores for physical health accounted for an additional 4% of the variance in SEE scores. When controlled for age and gender, SEE scores significantly predicted exercise activity (F = 78.8; p < 0.05), accounting for 30% of the variance in exercise activity. SF-12 subscale scores, when controlled for age and gender, significantly predicted SEE scores (F = 38.9; p < 0.05; F = 24.3; p < 0.05). The SF-12 subscale scores for mental health accounted for 17% of the variance in SEE scores, and the SF-12 subscale scores for physical health accounted for an additional 4% of the variance in SEE scores. When controlled for age and gender, SEE scores significantly predicted exercise activity (F = 78.8; p < 0.05), accounting for 30% of the variance in exercise activity.

Bibliography

Resnick, B. and Jenkins, L. S. (2000). "Testing the reliability and validity of the Self-Efficacy for Exercise scale." Nurs Res 49(3): 154-159. Find it on PubMed

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