Primary Image

Generic Background Image

Clinical Trial

Sensory-specific peripheral stimulation for tremor management

IRB Protocol Number STU00211930

Contact

Grace Hoo ghoo@sralab.org

Objective

Clinical Participants

The Shirley Ryan AbilityLab is seeking patients with Parkinson’s disease or Essential Tremor, to study the effect and ability of muscle stimulation to reduce tremor. Exclusion criteria include epilepsy/seizures and incompatibility with MRI or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). During the study, participants will be stimulated with non-invasive muscle electrostimulation and TMS while seated in a comfortable chair. To measure tremors, sensors will be placed over the wrist, elbow and shoulder and in some visits to the head. In two visits, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be used to observe the brain.

Healthy Participants

The Shirley Ryan AbilityLab is seeking healthy adults to study the effect and ability of muscle stimulation to reduce tremor. We are seeking Healthy adults to participate as a comparison group. During the study, participants will be stimulated with non-invasive muscle electrostimulation and/or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) while seated in a comfortable chair. To measure muscle activity, electrodes will be attached to the forearm. In one visit, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be used to observe your brain.

Who Can Participate

Participants must meet the following criteria:

Clinical Participants

  • English speaking adults
  • Patients diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, or essential tremor
  • Available to come to the AbilityLab for thirteen 1-4 hour visits 

 

Healthy Volunteers

  • English speaking adults
  • No history of neurological disease or injury
  • Available to come to the AbilityLab for five 1-4 hour visits

 

Compensation

Participants will be compensated up to $50/visit for their time and effort.

Age Range

Age Range 18-80

Apply for this Trial

Your information will not be published.

All fields are required.

Featured Quote

Save now, read later.

More Studies Like This

view all

Latest Updates

view all